Propaganda photo of a man hand filing reduction gears at a GE plant, 1942 by Dmitri Kessel. Probably a warship, but could be for a Victory Ship [853x1280]


Fun reality: the usa leases the decrease gears on most of our submarines Leases? Can the Russians apply for a $0 down repayment? We think it is simply as a result of the cost that is exorbitant of ...



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Some random comments on reddit about Propaganda photo of a man hand filing reduction gears at a GE plant, 1942 by Dmitri Kessel. Probably a warship, but could be for a Victory Ship [853x1280]

  • Fun fact: the US leases the reduction gears on most of our submarines
  • Leases? Can the Russians apply for a $0 down payment?
  • I think it's just because of the exorbitant cost of good reduction gears, they're one of the most important sound silencing things, and the Navy needs the experts to come in and do any work on them anyway, so it makes sense to lease. That being said, I've heard of boats that have thrown things into the (normally locked at all times) gears damaging them to the extent the navy has had to buy them.
  • So they lease them from the company that makes them? (GE?) What do the companies do when the submarines are scrapped? Do they take the reduction gears back and reuse them?
  • Interesting question since I saw this information given for ships other than subs once, including perhaps the Iowa class BB's. So does GE still inspect their property on them?
  • They probably still scrap them, the only real difference being the company that builds them is responsible for all the maintenance during the life time.
  • Yes but only on 2015 models, other wise its $3500 down
  • I've heard this so many times but have never seen a legitimate reference to back it up. It doesn't make sense, we sell or scrap our ships without returning the MRGs. I'm really starting to think this isn't true.
  • It very honestly could be sailor rumor. Then again, I heard it from the eng, and all the shipyarders while we were in there getting torn apart. It makes sense, in my mind. The mechanics don't actually do any work in the MRGs (that I know of) they more open them up for the contractors to work on, inspect them, and then go through a whole huge closeout inspection to make sure no one left a wrench in there before they lock them back up (with these huge super secure padlocks on every access.) Since I heard it from so many people, I assume it was not just sailor rumor, and it makes sense to lease them when I think about it, but the actual nature of the lease could be something drastically different than from how the kitchen I work in leases their coffee machines from the distributor.
  • It's very common that for very complex machinery companies lease the part instead buying outright. It means that the OEM is responsible for the maintenance and the buyer contracts a certain level of availability. It's also very common for things like jet engines.
  • Well, I know that the "T", the commuter rail for the Boston MA to Providence RI line is made up of train cars that are 'leased' from the company that built them. Which is very odd to me, because it's not like there is a huge market if the commuter rail organization decides to stop leasing them. I think it has something to do with 'creating more jobs' etc etc, where it's 'leased' on paper, but for all intents and purposes it's actually owned by the "T", they just don't buy it 100% outright so the organization and the states that give it cash don't become bankrupt, and the companies that build the cars get an inflow of cash continuously.
  • I've heard that, that was the case on the Iowas. It was at least mentioned in a documentary I think.
  • Great picture... and just for clarity.... all of our warships are victory ships. 🙂
  • To avoid confusion for people who might not know, Victory Ships (and their better-known predecessors, Liberty Ships ) were mass-produced cargo ships built to replace shipping losses from u-boats in WWII. They were built in astonishing numbers: 2,710 Liberty Ships and 534 Victory Ships were built. They were rapidly built, taking an average of 42 days...but SS Robert E. Peary , in a publicity stunt, was launched only "4 days, 15 hours and 29 minutes" after her keel was laid and commissioned three days after that.
  • I believe escort or "jeep" carriers were basically a flight deck and elevator on a Liberty Ship hull. It says in The Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors that some enemy shells passed right through the escort carriers' hulls without exploding.
  • Yeah that usually happened if an AP shell P'ed something that wasn't A.
  • hehe
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