USS Oklahoma (BB-37), undergoing the parbuckle (righting) process eight months after being capsized during the Pearl Harbor attack. [2727x1863]


Were the turrets held into the barbettes somehow? I happened to be under the impression that the turrets in battleships just kinda sat into the barbettes held in by their very own fat. real for uk and ...



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Some random comments on reddit about USS Oklahoma (BB-37), undergoing the parbuckle (righting) process eight months after being capsized during the Pearl Harbor attack. [2727x1863]

  • Were the turrets held into the barbettes somehow? I was under the impression that the turrets in battleships just kinda sat in the barbettes held in by their own weight.
  • true for british and german turrets. Americans clamped theirs down. No idea why though.
  • I watched a documentary on the Tirpitz 2 weeks ago. A survivor that served on the ship said as he was about to jump ship during the RAF doing what the RAF do, he witnessed an earthquake bomb hit the rear of the ship and the entire gun tower shot out of the hull and landed on people in the water swimming for shore. If your hull is extremely well armoured and stiff and a bomb penetrates the deck, the force has nowhere to go but up. Imagine bolting them down reduced damage from bombing raids.
  • Someone below has your answer
  • Here's an album I posted a few months ago: https://www.reddit.com/r/WarshipPorn/comments/4ijug7/salvage_operation_uss_oklahoma_bb37_the_photos_in/?st=ivlowhmt&sh=667bcd96
  • Holy cow. I've never seen most of those pictures. That's really cool.
  • Awesome read/pics. Much appreciated
  • Marine engineering is absolutely amazing. Imagine the effort into clearing out the harbor and even repairing some enough to send them back into battle. Of course I will hate to be the guy to climb through a ship that has been waterlogged for 8 months. It must suck to clean out unexploded ordinance and dead bodies.
  • Repairing nearly all of them. Of the battleships, only Oklahoma and Arizona didn't return to service.
  • Nobody knows where she sank at either. Her location is still a mystery.
  • Granted, that's not uncommon for deep water wrecks. The only wreckage of any IJN carrier yet found is this piece from Kaga . Sixteen years later we haven't found the rest of the wreck, or that of any other IJN carrier.
  • Picture 4, guy is standing between the wires. That would be so terrifying
  • When she was being towed for scapping, the 2 tugs lost her and she sank to 3,000 fathoms, almost taking them with her. "For the first 24 hours, everything seemed to be going well, and we were beginning to relax when it was noticed that the Oklahoma was developing a list to port (left). During the next four days, the list steadily increased, and when it reached about 30 degrees, we radioed the Coast Guard at Hawaii for instructions. We were told to return. " Anderson said it was during the end of his 6 p.m. to midnight watch on May 16 that he saw the Oklahoma - for some unknown reason - straighten up. "Then suddenly, I was aware we were going astern and gaining speed," he said. "Behind us, the lights of the Oklahoma disappeared. " The crew had considered that the ship might begin to sink and had disconnected the electric brake on the towing winch of the Monarch, simplifying the release of the brake. Anderson said he quickly ran to the stern to release the brake and saw the end of the towing cable disappear into the Pacific amid a shower of sparks. The weight of the ship had unreeled the wire, and none too soon. The Monarch's stern already was going underwater. Meanwhile, the Hercules crew was involved in a battle for survival. The stern, normally four feet above water, was covered as the Oklahoma dragged the tug backward rapidly. That made it impossible for crewmen to reach the towing winch. Just as it appeared the tug would follow the Oklahoma to the bottom, the winch exploded, showering the crew with metal, but freeing the craft.
  • Nice, now we know what happens when you drop a 28,000 ton anchor in the middle of the pacific.
  • hsit goes south quickly. Noted.
  • Holy hsit that would be terrifying.
  • Oh the turrets didn't fall out.
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