The Gearing-class destroyer Ernest G Small after losing her bow to a mine and subsequent heavy seas off Korea 1951. She made it back to Japan for repairs by steaming backwards. [2,273 x 1,647]


Destroyers are really extremely safe. In reality, present years have observed advances that are great. The front doesn't fall off usually. key word: "usually" It is as a result of all the maritime that is rigorous ...



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Some random comments on reddit about The Gearing-class destroyer Ernest G Small after losing her bow to a mine and subsequent heavy seas off Korea 1951. She made it back to Japan for repairs by steaming backwards. [2,273 x 1,647]

  • Destroyers are really very safe. In fact, recent years have seen great advances. The front doesn't usually fall off.
  • key word: "usually"
  • It's because of all the rigorous maritime engineering standards, there are regulations concerning the materials you can build a battleship with, for one cardboard is out.
  • Huh, why can't they use cardboard anymore?
  • This dosen't typilally happen id like to make that point
  • Beat me to it - love that clip
  • USS Fife (DD-991) after taking a torpedo hit during it's SINKEX, Aug, 2005. More info here from Navsource.
  • I love that the name of it was SINK-EXercise and it took a torpedo hit. I guess it failed cuz it didnt sink 😉
  • successful FLOATEX
  • HA
  • Reminds me of that dog missing it's face
  • Here is HMS Eskimo after losing her bow during the battle of Narvik. Not a very clean break from the look of things. http://www.ww2aircraft.net/forum/album/data/592/medium/HMS_Eskimo1.jpg https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Eskimo_%28F75%29#/media/File:HMSEskimoBowTorpedoDamageMay1940.jpg
  • The way warships can suffer damage like that and still be kept afloat is amazing to me. The amount of engineering and bravery it takes to fight a ship with that type of damage is nothing short of incredible.
  • The understanding of combat ship engineering has been a long and painful road. If you are interested in such things, check out this outstanding report on the damage sustained by the IJN Kirishima during the second battle of Guadalcanal. TLDR: Penetrating shells designed after WW1 really changed ship designs. No more mid deck open spaces, even behind 193mm of NS plate + 50mm teak + 24mm structure.
  • Holy shit. Thats an awesome report. Damn.
  • Glad I could provide! I found the link after googling something said in this sub, so I guess karma is cyclical.
  • That was one of the most interesting things I've read in ages. Thanks for linking it. I cannot imagine what it must have been like for those brave men (on all sides) as shells rained down on them. The very idea that a ship's crew could remain functional as such incredible destruction occurred all around them is amazing.
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