Nice save


Maybe not saying so it necessarily could have avoided this, but a reminder that is good always do a great seating check before shutting straight down in spots similar to this. Anybody know any single thing about any of it? Saw ...



This image with the title of "Nice save" is one of a large collection of pictures from the category Helicopters . We collect quality images, from a social network website reddit.com

Source: To view the original source also read the full comments of the original poster as well as from other redditor, you can click on the following Link.

Some random comments on reddit about Nice save

  • Not saying that it necessarily would have prevented this, but a good reminder to always do a good seating check before shutting down in spots like this.
  • Anybody know anything about this? Saw this randomly on imgur.
  • In 2010, a group of Hotshot wildland firefighters were moving an injured firefighter off a fire through rugged terrain to a primitive helispot to be evacuated. However, when the ship approached, the firefighters on the ground could not establish communications with the pilot. The pilot landed slightly off the pad, and when he cut power the ship tipped back to the position in your picture. The crews then cut a new helispot, and evac'd the injured firefighter in a different ship. Then, the firefighters righted the first helicopter and improved the pad so that the ship could sit level and eventually fly away. Great story of problem solving, and an all-too-rare happy outcome. Full story and video here , with the details about the helicopter starting at 6:40 .
  • Why did he "cut power" instead of "flying the aircraft" on an unimproved pinnacle? Is there a reason to not just keep it light on the skids, load the patient, and leave? As someone else alluded to, pilot was lucky it was a shrouded tail rotor, and this didn't end with more than one evacuee.
  • He only discovered that acft was tilting back after crew exited and he cut power.. . He thought he had a good safe LZ.
  • Happens more often then you think. You shutdown and as you step out to piss, your eurocopter's tilts back in a rut.
  • I can only guess, but possible reasons might include: He was low on fuel and seeing as the patient wasn't on site and ready to load he chose to shut down to conserve fuel (yeah, we know from the video that the patient was just around the corner, but he likely didn't know.) He was unfamiliar with how savvy the firefighters around him were with working around helicopters and felt the scene would be safer with the rotors stopped (most wildland firefighters have some basic familiarity with working with helicopters, but only some have specific training for working closely with them on the ground, and as an EMS pilot, I wouldn't expect him to know that anyway.) He may have had a company policy against using a spot that required a "fly the ship while on the ground" technique - for instance, the US Forest Service requires us to only use spots which allow all the weight of the aircraft to be placed on the skids - if it's at all toe-in, it's forbidden. In this case he would probably not have considered this option. *He may have been a little tunnel vision from the stress of having to land on such a spot in the first place, and just followed through with his normal routine.
  • Shrouded or not, I'd be worried about damaging the drive shaft and gear boxes that turn the tail rotor.
  • I'm trying to behave and only ask questions. As such, I'll assume the aircraft was properly checked out before flying it away....
  • It was. A mechanic flew into the other spot and inspected it first
  • The faring below the fenistron, is not a bumper and has no stinger. Its not designed for any impact. It probably got cracked. $15,000 new from airbus
  • The crews then cut a new helispot What does this entail?
  • Clearing or cutting down brush/small trees that would impede a safe landing.
  • No earth moving? Can you land in stumps?
  • That's generally not needed. Short, small stumps aren't a huge issue, but larger ones can puncture the belly. A good ground crew will lay a couple of logs on their side to place the rear of the skids of. This raises the belly, and more importantly the tail farther off the ground.
  • Thanks. Sorry, I don't fly. I just really like helicopters.
  • No worries. Everyone on here that fly helicopters are more than happy to talk at length about it.
  • Read more comments


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *