Concrete "applique armor" being applied to a Sherman


I really don't obtain it Patton was understood for really hating added armor similar to this. He forbade any applique armor to be properly used by any units under his command. He had been well understood for personally chewing out ...



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Some random comments on reddit about Concrete "applique armor" being applied to a Sherman

  • I don't get it
  • Patton was known for really hating added armor like this. He forbade any applique armor to be used by any units under his command. He was well known for personally chewing out crews that did it. This was partly because the additional weight over stressed the transmission and suspension creating maintenance issues. I imagine he also didn't like something he perceived as cowardly, especially if it didn't really help that much.
  • As I recall, the US Army found that applique armor made tanks more vulnerable, because it slowed them down with barely any improvement to effective armor. Speed is an important aspect of defense for a tank.
  • I have heard this as well. But I have also heard from someone on that Tank Talk series that it slightly improved crew survivability. But I haven't yet followed up on that for specific reasoning. I do remember him saying that it didn't decrease the number of tanks knocked out. This may have to do with how crews responded to penetrating hits. Usually, hole appears in your tank from a hit, you bail out. You don't have time to wait to see what was damaged or if the ammo is about to cook off. But that's just me spitballing.
  • I'm just recalling things I have heard from tank historians, not claiming any personal research on the subject. I do not dispute your correctness.
  • It would actually protect rather well against shaped charges. These were common from 1943 onwards in the form of Panzerfausts, the LG 40 recoilles rifle and other light anti-tank gun rounds such as the Stielgranate 41, which were HEAT rounds.
  • Actually according to Zaloga in Armored Thunderbolt these early HEAT rounds would often not detonate at the right time and stand-off armour like this would actually improve the penetration of shaped charges rather than add protection.
  • So would a piece of plywood, without the massive weight addition.
  • Against some weapons like the panzerfaust or steilegranate added armour or something like this which is effectively spaced armour can be surprisingly effective. Against high velocity guns like those on a tank or anti-tank gun, not so much. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stielgranate_41 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panzerfaust
  • Actually according to Zaloga in Armored Thunderbolt these early HEAT rounds would often not detonate at the right time and stand-off armour like this would actually improve the penetration of shaped charges rather than add protection.
  • Unless I'm remembering wrong, the concrete not only stressed the transmission, but provided additional normalization to some ammo types. Making it even easier to get a penetrating hit.
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